©

BENEDICT RESEARCH GROUP
Scientific Research
Stimuli Responsive Metal-Organic Frameworks
Molecular MOF Analogues
The design and synthesis of isolated segments of a metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) will offer valuable insights into the effects of metal secondary building units (SBUs) on photo-responsive linker molecules and other active linkers. These Molecular MOF Analogues (MMAs) will allow us to determine the structure and properties of the local chemical environment around the active linker molecule using a variety of techniques, such as solution phase spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction, which cannot be used to characterize the parent MOF crystals.
Photochromic technologies have the potential to transform traditionally passive materials into active materials which change their chemical or electronic properties in response to light stimulus. The Benedict group seeks to combine the photochromic molecules with metal-organic frameworks to create advanced materials for chemical separation, sensing and photo-mechanical actuation. The photochemical reactions in these materials, both desired and undesired, can be precisely monitored through spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction methods providing a molecular-level understanding of the physical processes that occur in these materials.
Photophysics of Diarylethene Photoswitches
This work is focuses on quantifying the fundamental physics which govern the photochromic reactions of the dithienylethene class of compounds with a combined experimental and theoretical approach. We utilize a combination of static and time-resolved X-ray crystallography, temperature-dependent solid state and solution state spectroscopy, as well as potential energy surface mapping techniques using complete active space self-consistent field computational methods to describe the energetic processes involved in both the dithienylethenes' cyclization and cycloreversion reactions.
Contact
About
Services
Home
2014 Jason Benedict. All rights reserved.
Organic Phosphorescent Materials
Solid-state photoluminescent complexes have a wide variety of applications in solid state lighting, displays, and chemical sensors. Unfortunately, many of these compounds contain low-abundance metals such as Pt, Ru, or Ir, limiting their wide-spread use. The Benedict group is investigating earth-abundant alternatives based on first row transition metal and organic compounds. We are also investigating the use of these emitters as low-flux up-conversion sensitizers.
Earth-Abundant Transition Metal Emitters
Solid-state photoluminescent complexes have a wide variety of applications in solid state lighting, displays, and chemical sensors. Unfortunately, many of these compounds contain low-abundance metals such as Pt, Ru, or Ir, limiting their wide-spread use. The Benedict group is investigating earth-abundant alternatives based on first row transition metal and organic compounds. We are also investigating the use of these emitters as low-flux up-conversion sensitizers.
Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxanes (POSS) as Models for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Transformations
The ability to efficiently and selectively convert the C-H and C=C bonds found in fossil fuel and petroleum product feedstocks into C-C, C-N and C-O bonds will require new catalysts that can facilitate bond breaking and forming steps with minimal energetic expense. This research project involves the creation of novel multi-component crystals incorporating catalytically active titanium-doped POSS clusters, oxidants, and/or target hydrocarbons to determine the geometry of association between the constituents at atomic resolution to develop a molecular level understanding of the processes in these materials.